Kurukulla Center

History of Kurukulla Center

Kurukulla Center started in September 1989, when the late Geshe Losang Jampa, who was the resident teacher at Milarepa Center, suggested to Lama Zopa Rinpoche that he might be able to reach more people if he lived in Boston rather than Vermont. Rinpoche agreed, and thus, Kurukulla Center came into being, and teachings were held at Wisdom Publications' offices on Newbury Street. Rinpoche appointed Nick Ribush as director "for the time being," which stretched into four years. Sadly, six months after arriving in Boston, Geshe Jampa-la was found to have stomach cancer, and he died a year later. For the next two years, the Center continued holding a few teachings and meditation at Wisdom.

In late 1993, our beloved Geshe Tsulga arrived to be resident teacher for a three-year term for three East Coast FPMT centers: Kurukulla, Milarepa, in Vermont, and Kadampa, in North Carolina. While in Boston, Geshe-la lived in apartments in Brighton and Jamaica Plain. Teachings were held in Geshela's apartments and at Wisdom Publications. After his three years were up, much to our delight, Geshe-la decided to settle in Boston. From 1997 until late 2001 most of the teachings were held at the Friends Meeting House in Cambridge. In January 2002 we moved into our home on Magoun Avenue, Medford. Geshe Tsulga taught with great success until developing cancer and passing away in the fall of 2010. Following Geshe-la's death, his nephew, Geshe Ngawang Tenley was appointed resident teacher by Lama Zopa Rinpoche.

After Nick, center directors have been Steve Rosenberg, Suzanne Persyn, Jennifer Barlow and David Kittelstrom, each directing for roughly two years. In September 2002 Wendy Cook took over the position. In 2008 the reigns passed back to Nick until Debra Thornburg took over in 2010.

For over twenty-two years many people have served and dedicated themselves in large and small ways, all to help make the center flourish. The Center has come a long way and there's much to rejoice about. The community as a whole continues to further establish Kurukulla Center as a wish-fulfilling jewel for the people of Boston, for future generations and for all beings.